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FUN FOR ALL AGES

ABOUT BREAN

Brean is a fantastic holiday destination with plenty to offer for all ages. There are many pubs, restaurants and shops in the village, along with a great selection of caravan parks and accommodation. As well as Brean’s famous stretch of sandy beach, there’s a whole host of activities and things to do in the area.
  • Sandy Beach & Brean Down Fort
  • Excellent Pubs & Live Music Venues
  • Great Selection of Restaurants & Takeaways
  • Brean Theme Park
  • Brean Splash Waterpark & Brean Play
  • Unique Visitor Attractions Nearby

We Offer

CARAVAN PARKS & ACCOMMODATION

We Offer

ATTRACTIONS & ENTERTAINMENT

HOW TO FIND BREAN

BY CAR

Exit the M5 at Junction 22. Follow the B3140 through Burnham-on-Sea to Berrow and Brean.

Please note some sat nav systems may direct you through narrow country lanes. We recommend following the directions above, particularly if you’re towing.

BY TRAIN

The nearest train stations to Brean are Weston-super-Mare (approx. 9 miles) and Highbridge & Burnham (approx. 7 miles). Visit the National Rail website for train times and information.

BY BUS

The ‘Coaster’ number 20 bus travels to Brean from Weston-super-Mare and Burnham-on-Sea. Please click here for the latest bus timetable.

 

HISTORY OF BREAN

Early signs of life on Brean Down date back to 10,000 B.C. There is archaeological evidence of extinct animals such as mammoths and woolly rhinos existing here. Ancient human settlement indications include burial mounds of the Bronze Age and a 4th century Roman temple.

Brean Down Fort was built in the 1860s as one of the Palmerston Forts to protect the ports of the Bristol Channel. No shots were ever fired in action, however in 1900 there was an explosion caused by a soldier firing into a magazine containing three tonnes of gunpowder, consequently losing his life. The explosion caused considerable damage and the fort was decommissioned in 1901.

When the Second World War began, the fort was re-armed as a coastal artillery battery. The site was used for experimental weapons testing, and one of the weapons trialled was the Bouncing Bomb. You can still wander around the ruins of the fort today and learn about its fascinating history.

Brean has strong agricultural roots and there are visible ‘Celtic’ fields on the Down, the remains of Bronze Age to Romano-British farming. Several of Brean’s caravan parks have an agricultural background and some are still involved with aspects of farming today.

There are two churches in Brean. St Bridget’s Church originates from the 13th century, though the fabric is predominantly 15th century and the church was extensively rebuilt around 1882. Brean Methodist Church was established in the late 1700s, however the current building was opened in 1933.

Now you know all about Brean’s rich history, look out for these landmarks and make sure you explore Brean Down!